Uncategorized Archive

How to be flood prepared…

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

June 27,  2013: Vermont rivers are full, and with more rain storms on the way beginning this evening and through the weekend, please be flood smart: clear out any clogged culverts on or near your property, turn around instead of driving flooded roads, and respect the power of flooding rivers by moving yourself out of harms way and securing important items.  Check out this great flood preparation checklist from the Friends of the Mad River.  And stay up to date with the most recent flood warnings from the National Weather Service.

 

Our Pursuits

Monday, March 4th, 2013

A SWIMMING HOLE IN EVERY TOWN

Photo credit: Stephan Beattie Places to cool off, slow down, relax, and have fun, swimming holes are a vital component of Vermont communities. Unfortunately, swimming holes are becoming increasingly off limits to the public. Our vision is of a permanently protected swimming hole in every town. By proactively protecting public access to these treasured places, we can guarantee Vermont residents will always have special places close by to enjoy.

PADDLING TRAILS AND FISHING ACCESSES

Photo credit: Stephan Beattie Vermont’s seventeen major watersheds provide a wide variety of recreational opportunities for paddlers and anglers. The Vermont River Conservancy is facilitating a strategic approach to ensuring adequate public access to the rivers of Vermont. Working with local partners, we are protecting and improving access points and primitive campsites, and coordinating collaborative arrangements for long-term stewardship.

FLOOD RESILIENT COMMUNITIES

Photo credit: Stephan Beattie Conserved floodplains provide room for rivers to meander naturally and release energy during intense flood events. VRC is partnering with local watershed groups, the state of Vermont, FEMA, and local landowners to conserve lands that provide these vital ecological services. By purchasing conservation easements within river meander corridors, we are ensuring our rivers will always have places to flood, thereby helping communities mitigate future storm impacts.

WILDLIFE CORRIDORS AND WATER QUALITY

Photo credit: Stephan Beattie River corridors provide vital habitat for much of Vermont’s wildlife and serve as routes for daily activities and seasonal migration. Intact streamside vegetation greatly improves water quality by reducing water temperatures, filtering out sediment, and providing food for aquatic life. The VRC is actively working with federal, state, and local conservation partners to protect priority wildlife habitats and to ensure high water quality for generations to come.

Public Access x 2!

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Watch this interview of VRC founder Stephan Syz, about the need to conserve public access to Vermont’s Rivers, on Senator Bill Doyle’s public access television show Vermont Issues!

Thank you Senator Bill Doyle and Orca Media – for helping VRC share the importance of protecting our state’s shorelands.

VRC & VLT partner with landowners to create riparian buffers on the Lamoille River

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

We are partnering with the Vermont Land Trust and willing landowners to help increase riparian buffers along the Lamoille River. The former power company Central Vermont Public Service Corporation, now Green Mountain Power, is helping fund feasibility research into expanding naturally vegetated riparian buffers in areas impacted by their operations. Increasing riparian buffers improves water quality, river bank stability, wildlife habitat, and flood resiliency.

Initial mapping of the targeted area has identified over thirty high priority parcels for creating riparian buffers – many on farm land already conserved by the Vermont Land Trust. VRC and VLT will work together with interested landowners to create a more ecologically robust and flood resilient Lamoille River. Creating riparian buffers upstream can help improve water quality downstream, and this has direct benefits for Lake Champlain, parts of which suffer from poor water quality in the summer.

Funding for this project is provided by Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (CVPS) through the VT Agency of Natural Resources Ecosystem Restoration Grant program, and the Vermont Community Foundation’s Lake Champlain Tributaries Restoration grants.

 

Canute Dalmasse Legacy Fund

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

 

Contributions to this fund were the catalyst for the development of the Connecticut River Paddlers’ Trail, a series of permanent access points and campsites spanning from the river’s headwaters south to the Massachusetts border. Together with area partners, we have completed seven campsites and three river access points, significantly expanding opportunities for Vermonters to explore one of New England’s greatest waterways.  Gifts helped establish a 7.3-acre park on the Missisquoi River in Enosburg Falls, providing anglers and paddlers 1,500 feet of permanent access to trophy trout waters.

 

9/18 (date change) & 9/24 CT River Paddlers’ Trail Work Trips

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

Please join us for campsite construction, lunch and paddling on the Connecticut River.  The Vermont River Conservancy is developing new campsites as part of the Connecticut River Paddlers’ Trail, a series of primitive campsites and river access points spanning 240 miles from the river’s headwaters to the Massachusetts border, and we need your help!

Date Change due to Hurricane Irene: Volunteer Sunday, September 18th to help build and install a picnic table, small box privy, register box and access signage at a newly designated campsite in Monroe, New Hampshire.

Volunteer Saturday, September 24th to construct a two-bin mouldering privy at a campsite in Maidstone, Vermont.

Lunch will be provided for both workdays. After the work party, join us paddling to explore these scenic stretches of the river.

For more information and to register, please contact Noah Pollock at noah.pollock (AT) gmail.com or (802) 540-0319.

Latest News

Save the Date for VRC’s 2nd Annual River Gala!

Please save the date for the Vermont River ... more »

VRC Welcomes Summer Stewardship Intern

VRC is happy to welcome Summer Stewardship ... more »

VRC is Hiring!

The Vermont River Conservancy is hiring a part-time ... more »

VRC Receives EPA Grant to Restore Floodplain

VRC is in line to receive a $200,000 grant ... more »

VRC Works With Partners to Protect Land Along the White River

–Below is an excerpt from an original ... more »

Help us protect Huntington Gorge today!

Vermont River Conservancy and the Richmond ... more »


See All »